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Five Spring-themed Educational Activities for Elementary School Kids

When kids are young, it’s fun to find a theme throughout the year that can help them get interested in academic educational activities. Now that spring is officially here parents and teachers can focus on spring-themed activities to help kids learn while having fun at the same time. Whether kids are doing an art project or learning about numbers, there are lots of ways elementary school age children can learn from the season.

Arts and crafts projects
There are some excellent spring-themed arts and crafts projects for kids that also have an educational element. Kids can learn about different types of flowers and even purchase a tulip bulb or wildflower seeds and plant them in a pot or their back garden. They can learn about soil and how much they need to water flowers and whether or not it needs to be in the sun or the shade. Then, they can draw or color the flowers as they bloom and document the growth pattern. Kids can also do some light research and learn about chlorophyll and sunlight. This fun project can teach kids about science and keep them occupied after school.

A nature field trip
There are so many great places around Southern California for an outdoor field trip. Whether students are at a state park, at the beach, or at one of the many local gardens, kids can learn a ton of things on a nature field trip. Today’s kids don’t get to go on as many field trips as former generations and so it’s a great activity to do after school or on the weekends. When kids are outdoors, they get fresh air and sunshine and can learn about so many things outside of the four walls of the classroom.

Educational technology
There are tons of apps available for elementary age kids that have fun and engaging themes to help them learn how to count and do math or learn new words and work on reading comprehension. Although we think about the good weather when we think about spring, educational technology can keep kids busy on the occasional rainy day. Younger students need to be entertained and think of learning as a fun activity, and educational technology is one of the best ways to keep them interested in academics. Toca Nature (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/toca-nature/id893927401?mt=8) is a good example.

Writing skills
Writing skills were particularly important at this point in the academic year because kids are starting to get tired and need that extra motivation to push through to June. There are lots of ways that elementary school kids can work on their writing skills outside of the classroom while still enjoying the great weather that comes with spring. Kids can publish an issue of their magazine or describe the setting in their back garden. They can do some research to find a new word or phrase to describe something they see outdoors. For example, they might describe a flower as “fuchsia,” or “magenta” as opposed to simply “pink.” When kids learn about synonyms, their writing skills will improve, and their paragraphs become more interesting to read.

Study skills
Despite all of the fun outdoor activities available to kids at this time of the year, it’s still important to work on study skills. Even little kids get a case of senioritis and need help redirecting themselves to academic tasks. Sometimes, learning can be made more fun by including the five senses on a field trip or through an art project. Other times kids just need help studying more efficiently so they can move on to other tasks or extracurricular activities. A great way to help kids stay on task is to have them work with a tutor to make sure that their backpack and binder is neatly organized, their assignments are prioritized, and that they understand all of the new concepts their teacher is introducing in class.

Robyn Scott is a private English tutor at TutorNerds. She attended the University of California, Irvine as an undergraduate and the University of Southampton in England as a graduate student. She has worked with students from the United States, Japan, South Korea, the European Union, and Africa.

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