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Yo-Yo Flower Headband Tutorial

 

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These little flower are known traditionally as yo-yo flowers and have been around, I hear, since the Great Depression when women used to make them out of scrap fabric. They are cute, versatile and, best of all, super simple to make. You can whip one up in mere minutes.

The uses for them are limited only by imagination, and Pinterest can provide lots of inspiration. Embellish a shirt, pin them to a scarf, tack a few of them on a throw pillow, or make a headband like we did here. Once you know how to make them, the possibilities are endless!

Yo-Yo Flower Headband Tutorial

Supplies:

  1. Fabric – any fabric will work, but thinner cotton-type is easiest to start with
  2. Needle and thread
  3. Headband
  4. Gem embellishment
  5. Circle template
  6. Scissors
  7. Pen

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Method:

On the wrong side of the fabric, trace your circle template.  We used a 7-inch plate here, which yields a just over 3-inch flower.

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Cut out your circle. The beauty of this project is that it is very forgiving and does NOT have to be perfect. We even use wrinkled scrap fabric because once the flower is complete, the wrinkles will never show; no need to iron – Hooray! So you can carve that little circle out quickly.

Turn the ugly side of the fabric together, and using a running stitch (read: fancy name for your basic hand stitch), make a small (approximately 1/8-inch) hem all the way along the outside of the circle, allowing the fabric to gather as you go.

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Once you have hemmed the entire circle, pull the stitching tight.  The smaller the stitches you make, the tighter the yo-yo center will be; the larger the stitches you make, the larger the yo-yo center will be. The weight of your fabric will also factor in here.

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Flatten your yo-yo out so that it resembles a “flower.”

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Pass the needle and thread through the opening of the yo-yo catching just a bit of the folds of the top of the flower and pinning it to the bottom of the flower. Only three or four stitches are needed here; just enough to secure the yo-yo flat the way you like it.

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This is what the bottom of the yo-yo should look like once you’ve made your tacking stitches.

IMG_8093Voila, you have your basic yo-yo flower!

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Now on to the fun stuff: embellishments, and what to do with your flower!

For this flower, we chose a coordinating gem heart to embellish the middle (embellishment is not necessary, but generally we like everything with a little more bling around here!) And we chose to secure the  flower to an elastic headband, in a coordinating pink, naturally. Feel free to use whatever you prefer to secure hair – hard headband, alligator clip, barrette, etc.

IMG_8095Using a bit of hot glue, secure your elastic into a size-appropriate circle for a headband.  My girls have heads in the 95th percentile (read: huge!) so standard size headbands never work for them.  If you want the best fit, measure your elastic snuggly around your models head and then add about an inch to that measurement, which will allow you half an inch overlap on both ends to glue securely together.

IMG_8096Run a strip of hot glue along the backside of your flower, spanning the entire width. Then pop your headband on, hiding the glued together seem underneath the flower.

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And there you have your very simple, but very cute, yo-yo flower headband!

IMG_8099Now, go gather fabric scraps and make one in every color.  They are the perfect accessory to any outfit!

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Mollie is a wife to a wonderful man and stay at home Mama to two beautiful and energetic little girls. She has lived in South Orange County for most of her life and enjoys crafting, running, clean and natural living, party planning, and being involved in her community and church. She believes that being a Mom was and is her highest calling and attempts to give her girls a wide array of different experiences. From soccer cleats to tutus, running races to finding the perfect hair bow, she wants them to grow up knowing that they can be both girly and strong.
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